ANIMAL A-Z…


Learn more about our amazing animal collection. Click on a letter below to find an animal or use our animal search:

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Dab, Common (Limanda limanda)

Dab, Common
Dab, Common
The common dab, or 'flounder', is a type of flatfish. It can be distinguished from other flatfish, as it has both eyes on the right side of its head and the scales on the eyed-side are toothed and rough. Their colour varies from pale yellow to greyish, also brownish green.
Fun Facts... A female dabfish is extremely fertile, producing one million eggs!

Most of the dab's life is spend lying at the bottom, but they can swim rapidly for short distances.

Location... The common dab can be found along the Western European coasts of Iceland, from the Bay of Biscay to the White Sea. It is also found in the Baltic Sea, Gulf of Finland and southern North Sea.

Habitat... Inhabits sandy and muddy bottoms, in shallower water in the summer. In Autumn, they are found in waters up to 150 metres deep.

Diet...
Feeds upon hermit crabs, isopods, shrimp, mussels and worms.

Not Evaluated

Damsel, Blue star (Pomacentrus alleni)

Damsel, Blue star
Damsel, Blue star
The blue star damsel is also know as the neon damsel or Allen's damsel, after Dr Gerald Allen - the world's authority on damselfishes. It has a slender, neon-blue body, with a blending of yellow towards the anal fin. It grows up to about 6cm in length.
Fun Facts... When mating, these fish form distinct pairs. Eggs are laid in the substrate and males tend to the nest, aerating the eggs and guarding them from predators.

Location... Found in the eastern Indian Ocean: Similan Island, Thailand and parts of Indonesia.

Habitat... Inhabit rubble and dead reef outer slopes, usually in small groups.

Diet...
Omnivorous, small invertebrates and vegetation.

Not Evaluated

Damsel, Neon Velvet (Neogylphidodon oxyodon)

Damsel, Neon Velvet
Damsel, Neon Velvet
The neon velvet damsel is black with two horizontal, irridecent blue stripes and one vertical white stripe. It reaches about 15cm in length and juveniles are dark blue with a yellow stripe or spot. This fades with age. They can be quite territorial and will pair up when breeding. The female lays sticky eggs which adhere to rocks, they male will guard and aerate the eggs.
Fun Facts... A female neon velvet damsel can lay up to twenty thousand eggs in one go!

Location... Western Central Pacific; Indo-Australian Archipelago, including the Philippines and Indonesia.

Habitat... Inhabits protected reef flats in lagoons and inshore reefs.

Diet...
Omnivore, will eat zooplankton and algae.

Not Evaluated

Damselfish, Blue (Chrysiptera cyanea)

Damselfish, Blue
Damselfish, Blue

Recognised by the brilliant light-blue colour. This small (max 8.5cm) species exhibits a colour difference between sexes; juveniles and females usually have a small black spot at the rear base of the dorsal fin and lack yellow; males have a bright yellow snout and tail. This species live in social groups of one male and several females.


Fun Facts...

The male will guard the eggs by chasing away egg thieves such as wrasses and aerates them by swimming over the top.



Location...

Widespread in the Indo-West Pacific region.



Habitat...

Tropical coral reefs.



Diet...
Algae and small crustaceans.

Not Evaluated

Damselfish, Humbug (Dascyllus aruanus)

Damselfish, Humbug
Damselfish, Humbug

The humbug damselfish grows up to about 8.5cm in length. It has a white body with three black bars running vertically down its body. The first bar is over the head, the second runs from the dorsal fin to the abdomen and the third is just before the tail. It is because of this colouration that it gets its common name as it looks like the tradional 'humbug' sweet. The snout and tail are both white.


Fun Facts...

Male humbug damselfish will make a nest and invite the female in to spawn. They then potect the eggs until they hatch and will aggressively drive off other fish.



Location...

Found in the Indo-West Pacific from the Red Sea and East Africa to the Tuamoto islands, north to southern Japan and south to Sydney in Australia. 



Habitat...

Inhabits shallow lagoons and subtidal reef flats. 



Diet...
Feeds on zooplankton, benthic invertebrates and algae.

Not Evaluated

Damselfish, Lemon (Pomacentrus moluccensis)

Damselfish, Lemon
These brightly coloured fish will form pairs during breeding season. Once the female has laid her eggs, the male will guard them until they have hatched. 
Fun Facts...

Location... Native to the Western Pacific Ocean.

Habitat... Lemon damselfish feed upon alge and invertebretates and can be found in and around coral reefs.

Diet...


Not Evaluated

Damselfish, Yellow tail (Chrysiptera parasema)

Damselfish, Yellow tail
Damselfish, Yellow tail

The yellow tail damselfish is an extremely vibrant fish with its jewel-blue body contrasting with its bright yellow tail. They grow up to about 8cm and have 13 dorsal spines. The pectoral fins can be yellow or blue.


Fun Facts...

The male is a doting father, protecting the eggs by driving off predators and aerating them by moving water over them with his fins.



Location...

Found in the western Pacific, including the Solomon Islands, northern Paua New Guinea, Philippines and Ryukyu Islands.



Habitat...

Inhabit coral-rich areas of sheltered lagoons and inshore coral reefs



Diet...
Feeds mainly on zooplankton and algae.

Not Evaluated

Danio, Zebra (Danio rerio)

Danio, Zebra
Widely distributed from India to Nepal
Fun Facts...

Location...

Habitat...

Diet...


Least Concern

Dart Frog, Dyeing (Dendrobates tinctorius)

Dart Frog, Dyeing
Dart Frog, Dyeing
The largest or all dart frog species, these bold and active frogs have large, black eyes and can seem hunched in posture. The dyeing dart frog has a bright colouration which functions as a warning to predators. It can come in various colour morphs, dependent on its location. The Brazilian dyeing dart frog has a yellow cap, which extends down the back. It also has lighter coloured toes.

Males are slimmer than females and have heart-shaped suction cups on its toes. Females appear plump and have rounded toes. They can grow to 6cm in length.
Fun Facts... Their bright colours warn about their toxicity, which they obtain from eating ants! Females may fight for males and the winner earns the right to stroke the male's snout and back with her forelegs in
courtship.

It has the name 'dyeing' from an old legend, in which native people used a secretion from the frog's skin to 'dye' the green feathers of a parrot, to red.

When the eggs are laid, the male tends to them and keeps them moist. After they hatch into tadpoles, the male and female carry them on their backs to water pools within plants.



Location... South America: Brazil, Suriname, French Guiana and parts of Guyana.

Habitat... Inhabits the forest floor, under the cover of rocks and moss around streams. Can also be found up to five metres in trees.

Diet...
Small arthropods, such as ants.

Least Concern

Distichodus, Six-bar (Distichodus sexfasciatus)

Distichodus, Six-bar
Found throughout the Congo River basins.
Fun Facts...

Location...

Habitat...

Diet...


Least Concern
TODAY AT WESTON...

OPEN: Daily from 10.00am.
LAST ADMISSION: 4.00pm
CLOSES: 5.00pm

See our Opening Times & Prices page for further info.

ADMISSION:
Adult - £9.50 (16-64yrs)
Child - £7.50 (3-15yrs)
Under 3's - Free
Concessions - £8.50
(Senior Citizen, Disabled, Student).


SEAQUARIUM SEEKS EXPLORERS

From 1 August to 31 August 2017, SeaQuarium Weston is hosting their annual Explorer’s Event. 

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FREE Activity Booklet!

During your visit to the SeaQuarium, don’t forget to take part in our free children’s activity booklet.
Pick up a booklet, find the answers to the questions around SeaQuarium and play some fun games along the way! Children will even receive a sticker at the end of their visit when shown to a member of staff!

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